Patient Resources

genbiopro-here-to-help

Working to Improve Care

GenBioPro is committed to research, advocacy and working with our community to help ensure that access to safe, affordable, reproductive health care – including medical abortion – is within reach of everyone.

There are many organizations doing important work to advance reproductive health care in the US. Here are some of the most important ones.

Trusted Providers

Abortion Care Network

abortioncarenetwork.org

Founded in 2008, Abortion Care Network (ACN) is the national association for independent, community-based, abortion care providers and their allies. Together they work to ensure the rights of all people to experience respectful, dignified abortion care.

Abortion Clinics Online

abortionclinics.com

Abortion Clinics Online (ACOL) is the first and largest online directory for abortion clinic websites, in operation since 1995. Find referrals to reputable and trusted abortion care providers in your area.

National Abortion Federation

prochoice.org

The National Abortion Federation (NAF) is a professional association of abortion providers. Members include individuals, private and non-profit clinics, some Planned Parenthood affiliates, women’s health centers, physicians’ offices, and hospitals who together care for approximately half the women who choose abortion in the US and Canada each year.

Planned Parenthood

plannedparenthood.org

Planned Parenthood is a trusted health care provider, an informed educator, a passionate advocate, and a global partner helping similar organizations around the world. Planned Parenthood delivers vital reproductive health care, sex education, and information to millions of women, men, and young people worldwide.

Support Organizations

All Options

all-options.org

All-Options, formerly Backline, uses direct service and social change strategies to promote unconditional, judgment-free support for people in all of their decisions, feelings, and experiences with pregnancy, parenting, abortion, and adoption. It recognizes that these issues are complex, but one thing is certain: Everyone deserves to have all options.

Bedsider

bedsider.org

Bedsider is an online birth control support network operated by Power to Decide. Power to Decide works to ensure that every young person has the power to decide if, when, and under what circumstances to get pregnant—increasing their opportunity to pursue the future they want.

Connect & Breathe

connectandbreathe.org

Connect & Breathe provides a national talk line staffed by specially trained volunteers. They strive to create a safe space to talk about abortion experiences by listening and providing unbiased support.

National Network of Abortion Funds (NNAF)

abortionfunds.org

The national Network of Abortion Funds builds power with members to remove financial and logistical barriers to abortion access by centering people who have had abortions and organizing at the intersections of racial, economic, and reproductive justice.

Health Care Professional Organizations

American College of Nurse-Midwives

midwife.org

The American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM) is the professional association that represents certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) and certified midwives (CMs) in the United States. ACNM sets the standard of excellence in midwifery education and practice in the United States and strengthens the capacity of midwives in developing countries.

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

acog.org

Founded in 1951, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) is the specialty’s premier professional membership organization dedicated to the improvement of women’s health.

American Society for Reproductive Medicine

asrm.org

The American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) advances reproductive medicine through education, research, and advocacy.

Ryan Residency Training Program

ryanprogram.org

The Kenneth J. Ryan Residency Training Program in Abortion and Family Planning is a national initiative that offers dedicated, formal training in abortion and family planning for medical residents specializing in obstetrics and gynecology.

Research Organizations

The Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health

bixbycenter.ucsf.edu

The UCSF Bixby Center advances reproductive health policy and practice worldwide through research, training, and advocacy.

Guttmacher Institute

guttmacher.org

The Guttmacher Institute is a leading research and policy organization committed to advancing sexual and reproductive health and rights in the United States and globally.

Gynuity

gynuity.org

Gynuity develops and advocates for the use of scientific, clinical and programmatic evidence in reproductive and maternal health, assuring that each individual benefits from the fruits of medical science and technology.

The Stigma Toolkit

stigmatoolkit.org

The Sea Change Program worked to transform the culture of stigma around abortion and other stigmatized reproductive experiences.  Through research and program evaluation, they created the Stigma Toolkit to document what works to create culture change around reproduction.

Advocacy Organizations

NARAL Pro-Choice America

prochoiceamerica.org

The 2 million members of NARAL Pro-Choice America fight for reproductive freedom for every person in every state. Each day, they organize and mobilize to protect that freedom by fighting for access to abortion care, birth control, paid parental leave and protections from pregnancy discrimination.

Third Wave Fund

thirdwavefund.org

Third Wave Fund is a feminist, activist organization that works nationally to support young women and transgender youth ages 15 to 30. Through strategic grant making, leadership development, and philanthropic advocacy, it supports groups and individuals working towards gender, racial, economic, and social justice.

UltraViolet

weareultraviolet.org

UltraViolet drives feminist cultural and political change. It is a powerful community of 1 million people across the country working to improve the lives of women and girls of all identities, and all people impacted by sexism, by disrupting patriarchy and creating a cost for sexism.

Important Safety Information

What is the most important information I should know about mifepristone tablets, 200mg?

What symptoms should I be concerned with? Although cramping and bleeding are an expected part of ending a pregnancy, rarely, serious and potentially life-threatening bleeding, infections, or other problems can occur following a miscarriage, surgical abortion, medical abortion, or childbirth. Seeking medical attention as soon as possible is needed in these circumstances. Serious infection has resulted in death in a very small number of cases. There is no information that use of mifepristone tablets, 200mg, and misoprostol caused these deaths. If you have any questions, concerns, or problems, or if you are worried about any side effects or symptoms, you should contact your health care provider.

Be sure to contact your health care provider promptly if you have any of the following:

  • Heavy Bleeding. Contact your health care provider right away if you bleed enough to soak through two thick full-size sanitary pads per hour for two consecutive hours or if you are concerned about heavy bleeding. In about 1 out of 100 women, bleeding can be so heavy that it requires a surgical procedure (surgical aspiration or D&C).
  • Abdominal Pain or “Feeling Sick.” If you have abdominal pain or discomfort, or you are “feeling sick,” including weakness, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea, with or without fever, more than 24 hours after taking misoprostol, you should contact your health care provider without delay. These symptoms may be a sign of a serious infection or another problem (including an ectopic pregnancy, a pregnancy outside the womb).
  • Fever. In the days after treatment, if you have a fever of 100.4°F or higher that lasts for more than 4 hours, you should contact your health care provider right away. Fever may be a symptom of a serious infection or another problem.

If you cannot reach your health care provider, go to the nearest hospital emergency room. Take the Medication Guide with you. When you visit an emergency room or a health care provider who did not give you your mifepristone tablets, 200mg, you should give them your Medication Guide so that they understand that you are having a medical abortion with mifepristone tablets, 200mg.

What to do if you are still pregnant after mifepristone tablets, 200mg, with misoprostol treatment. If you are still pregnant, your health care provider will talk with you about a surgical procedure to end your pregnancy. In many cases, this surgical procedure can be done in the office/clinic. The chance of birth defects if the pregnancy is not ended is unknown.

Talk with your health care provider. Before you take mifepristone, you should read the Medication Guide and you and your health care provider should discuss the benefits and risks of your using mifepristone tablets, 200mg.

 

What is mifepristone tablets, 200mg?

Mifepristone tablets, 200mg, is used in a regimen with another prescription medicine called misoprostol to end an early pregnancy. Early pregnancy means it is 70 days (10 weeks) or less since your last menstrual period began. Mifepristone tablets, 200mg, are not approved for ending pregnancies that are further along. Mifepristone blocks a hormone needed for your pregnancy to continue. When you use mifepristone on Day 1, you also need to take another medicine called misoprostol 24 to 48 hours after you take mifepristone tablets, 200mg, to cause the pregnancy to be passed from your uterus.

The pregnancy is likely to be passed from your uterus within 2 to 24 hours after taking mifepristone tablets, 200mg, and misoprostol. When the pregnancy is passed from the uterus, you will have bleeding and cramping that will likely be heavier than your usual period. About 2 to 7 out of 100 women taking mifepristone tablets, 200mg, will need a surgical procedure because the pregnancy did not completely pass from the uterus or to stop bleeding.

 

Who should not take mifepristone tablets, 200mg?

Some women should not take mifepristone tablets, 200mg. Do not take mifepristone tablets, 200mg, if you:

  • Have a pregnancy that is more than 70 days (10 weeks). Your health care provider may do a clinical examination, an ultrasound examination, or other testing to determine how far along you are in pregnancy.
  • Are using an IUD (intrauterine device or system). It must be taken out before you take mifepristone tablets, 200mg.
  • Have been told by your health care provider you have a pregnancy outside the uterus (ectopic pregnancy).
  • Have problems with your adrenal glands (chronic adrenal failure).
  • Take medicine to thin your blood.
  • Have a bleeding problem.
  • Have porphyria.
  • Take certain steroid medicines.
  • Are allergic to mifepristone, misoprostol or medicines that contain misoprostol, such as Cytotec or Arthrotec.

Ask your health care provider if you are not sure about all your medical conditions before taking this medicine to find out if you can take mifepristone tablets, 200mg.

 

What should I tell my health care provider before taking mifepristone tablets, 200mg?

Before you take mifepristone tablets, 200mg, tell your health care provider if you:

  • Cannot follow-up within approximately 7 to 14 days of your first visit.
  • Are breastfeeding. Mifepristone tablets, 200mg, can pass into your breast milk. The effect of  the mifepristone tablets, 200mg, and misoprostol regimen on the breastfed infant or on milk production is unknown.
  • Are taking medicines, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

Mifepristone tablets, 200mg, and certain other medicines may affect each other if they are used together. This can cause side effects.

 

How should I take mifepristone tablets, 200mg?

Mifepristone tablets, 200mg, will be given to you by a health care provider in a clinic, medical office, or hospital.

You and your health care provider will plan the most appropriate location for you to take the misoprostol, because it may cause bleeding, cramps, nausea, diarrhea, and other symptoms that usually begin within 2 to 24 hours after taking it.

Most women will pass the pregnancy within 2 to 24 hours after taking the misoprostol tablets.

Follow the instruction below on how to take mifepristone tablets, 200mg, and misoprostol: Mifepristone tablets, 200mg, (1 tablet) orally + misoprostol (4 tablets) buccally

Day 1:

  • Take 1 mifepristone 200mg tablet by mouth.
  • Your health care provider will either give you or prescribe for you 4 misoprostol tablets to take 24 to 48 hours later.

24 to 48 hours after taking mifepristone tablets, 200mg:

  • Place 2 misoprostol tablets in each cheek pouch (the area between your teeth and cheek) for 30 minutes and then swallow anything left over with a drink of water or another liquid.
  • The medicines may not work as well if you take misoprostol sooner than 24 hours after mifepristone tablets, 200mg, or later than 48 hours after mifepristone tablets, 200mg.
  • Misoprostol often causes cramps, nausea, diarrhea, and other symptoms. Your health care provider may send you home with medicines for these symptoms.

Follow-up Assessment at Day 7 to 14:

  • This follow-up assessment is very important. You must follow up with your health care provider about 7 to 14 days after you have taken mifepristone tablets, 200mg, to be sure you are well, that you have had bleeding, and the pregnancy has passed from your uterus.
  • Your health care provider will assess whether your pregnancy has passed from your uterus. If your pregnancy continues, the chance that there may be birth defects is unknown. If you are still pregnant, your healthcare provider will talk with you about a surgical procedure to end your pregnancy.
  • If your pregnancy has ended, but not yet completely passed from your uterus, your provider will talk with you about other choices you have, including waiting, taking another dose of misoprostol, or having a surgical procedure to empty your uterus.

 

When should I begin birth control?

You can become pregnant again right after your pregnancy ends. If you do not want to become pregnant again, start using birth control as soon as your pregnancy ends or before you start having sexual intercourse again.

 

What should I avoid while taking mifepristone and misoprostol?

Do not take any other prescription or over-the-counter medicines (including herbal medicines or supplements) at any time during the treatment period without first asking your health care provider about them because they may interfere with the treatment. Ask your health care provider about what medicines you can take for pain and other side effects.

 

What are the possible side effects of mifepristone tablets, 200mg, and misoprostol?

Mifepristone may cause serious side effects.  See “What is the most important information I should know about mifepristone tablets, 200mg?” above. 

Cramping and bleeding. Cramping and vaginal bleeding are expected with this treatment. Usually, these symptoms mean that the treatment is working. But sometimes you can get cramping and bleeding and still be pregnant. This is why you must follow-up with your health care provider approximately 7 to 14 days after taking mifepristone tablets, 200mg. See “How should I take mifepristone tablets, 200mg?” for more information on your follow-up assessment. If you are not already bleeding after taking mifepristone, you probably will begin to bleed once you take misoprostol, the medicine you take 24 to 48 hours after mifepristone tablets, 200mg. Bleeding or spotting can be expected for an average of 9 to 16 days and may last for up to 30 days. Your bleeding may be similar to, or greater than, a normal heavy period. You may see blood clots and tissue. This is an expected part of passing the pregnancy.

The most common side effects of mifepristone treatment include: nausea, weakness, fever/chills, vomiting, headache, diarrhea and dizziness. Your provider will tell you how to manage any pain or other side effects. These are not all the possible side effects of mifepristone tablets, 200mg.

Call your health care provider for medical advice about any side effects that bother you or do not go away. You may report side effects to FDA at1-800-FDA-1088.

 

General information about the safe and effective use of mifepristone tablets, 200mg.

Medicines are sometimes prescribed for purposes other than those listed in a Medication Guide. This Medication Guide summarizes the most important information about Mifepristone tablets, 200mg. If you would like more information, talk with your health care provider. You may ask your health care provider for information about mifepristone tablets, 200mg, that is written for health care professionals.

 

For additional information about mifepristone, click for the Medication Guide and Full Prescribing Information.

 

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
Show More

What is the most important information I should know about mifepristone tablets, 200mg?

What symptoms should I be concerned with? Although cramping and bleeding are an expected part of ending a pregnancy, rarely, serious and potentially life-threatening bleeding, infections, or other problems can occur following a miscarriage, surgical abortion, medical abortion, or childbirth. Seeking medical attention as soon as possible is needed in these circumstances. Serious infection has resulted in death in a very small number of cases. There is no information that use of mifepristone tablets, 200mg, and misoprostol caused these deaths. If you have any questions, concerns, or problems, or if you are worried about any side effects or symptoms, you should contact your health care provider.

Be sure to contact your health care provider promptly if you have any of the following:

  • Heavy Bleeding. Contact your health care provider right away if you bleed enough to soak through two thick full-size sanitary pads per hour for two consecutive hours or if you are concerned about heavy bleeding. In about 1 out of 100 women, bleeding can be so heavy that it requires a surgical procedure (surgical aspiration or D&C).
  • Abdominal Pain or “Feeling Sick.” If you have abdominal pain or discomfort, or you are “feeling sick,” including weakness, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea, with or without fever, more than 24 hours after taking misoprostol, you should contact your health care provider without delay. These symptoms may be a sign of a serious infection or another problem (including an ectopic pregnancy, a pregnancy outside the womb).
  • Fever. In the days after treatment, if you have a fever of 100.4°F or higher that lasts for more than 4 hours, you should contact your health care provider right away. Fever may be a symptom of a serious infection or another problem.

If you cannot reach your health care provider, go to the nearest hospital emergency room. Take the Medication Guide with you. When you visit an emergency room or a health care provider who did not give you your mifepristone tablets, 200mg, you should give them your Medication Guide so that they understand that you are having a medical abortion with mifepristone tablets, 200mg.

What to do if you are still pregnant after mifepristone tablets, 200mg, with misoprostol treatment. If you are still pregnant, your health care provider will talk with you about a surgical procedure to end your pregnancy. In many cases, this surgical procedure can be done in the office/clinic. The chance of birth defects if the pregnancy is not ended is unknown.

Talk with your health care provider. Before you take mifepristone, you should read the Medication Guide and you and your health care provider should discuss the benefits and risks of your using mifepristone tablets, 200mg.

 

What is mifepristone tablets, 200mg?

Mifepristone tablets, 200mg, is used in a regimen with another prescription medicine called misoprostol to end an early pregnancy. Early pregnancy means it is 70 days (10 weeks) or less since your last menstrual period began. Mifepristone tablets, 200mg, are not approved for ending pregnancies that are further along. Mifepristone blocks a hormone needed for your pregnancy to continue. When you use mifepristone on Day 1, you also need to take another medicine called misoprostol 24 to 48 hours after you take mifepristone tablets, 200mg, to cause the pregnancy to be passed from your uterus.

The pregnancy is likely to be passed from your uterus within 2 to 24 hours after taking mifepristone tablets, 200mg, and misoprostol. When the pregnancy is passed from the uterus, you will have bleeding and cramping that will likely be heavier than your usual period. About 2 to 7 out of 100 women taking mifepristone tablets, 200mg, will need a surgical procedure because the pregnancy did not completely pass from the uterus or to stop bleeding.

 

Who should not take mifepristone tablets, 200mg?

Some women should not take mifepristone tablets, 200mg. Do not take mifepristone tablets, 200mg, if you:

  • Have a pregnancy that is more than 70 days (10 weeks). Your health care provider may do a clinical examination, an ultrasound examination, or other testing to determine how far along you are in pregnancy.
  • Are using an IUD (intrauterine device or system). It must be taken out before you take mifepristone tablets, 200mg.
  • Have been told by your health care provider you have a pregnancy outside the uterus (ectopic pregnancy).
  • Have problems with your adrenal glands (chronic adrenal failure).
  • Take medicine to thin your blood.
  • Have a bleeding problem.
  • Have porphyria.
  • Take certain steroid medicines.
  • Are allergic to mifepristone, misoprostol or medicines that contain misoprostol, such as Cytotec or Arthrotec.

Ask your health care provider if you are not sure about all your medical conditions before taking this medicine to find out if you can take mifepristone tablets, 200mg.

 

What should I tell my health care provider before taking mifepristone tablets, 200mg?

Before you take mifepristone tablets, 200mg, tell your health care provider if you:

  • Cannot follow-up within approximately 7 to 14 days of your first visit.
  • Are breastfeeding. Mifepristone tablets, 200mg, can pass into your breast milk. The effect of  the mifepristone tablets, 200mg, and misoprostol regimen on the breastfed infant or on milk production is unknown.
  • Are taking medicines, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

Mifepristone tablets, 200mg, and certain other medicines may affect each other if they are used together. This can cause side effects.

 

How should I take mifepristone tablets, 200mg?

Mifepristone tablets, 200mg, will be given to you by a health care provider in a clinic, medical office, or hospital.

You and your health care provider will plan the most appropriate location for you to take the misoprostol, because it may cause bleeding, cramps, nausea, diarrhea, and other symptoms that usually begin within 2 to 24 hours after taking it.

Most women will pass the pregnancy within 2 to 24 hours after taking the misoprostol tablets.

Follow the instruction below on how to take mifepristone tablets, 200mg, and misoprostol: Mifepristone tablets, 200mg, (1 tablet) orally + misoprostol (4 tablets) buccally

Day 1:

  • Take 1 mifepristone 200mg tablet by mouth.
  • Your health care provider will either give you or prescribe for you 4 misoprostol tablets to take 24 to 48 hours later.

24 to 48 hours after taking mifepristone tablets, 200mg:

  • Place 2 misoprostol tablets in each cheek pouch (the area between your teeth and cheek) for 30 minutes and then swallow anything left over with a drink of water or another liquid.
  • The medicines may not work as well if you take misoprostol sooner than 24 hours after mifepristone tablets, 200mg, or later than 48 hours after mifepristone tablets, 200mg.
  • Misoprostol often causes cramps, nausea, diarrhea, and other symptoms. Your health care provider may send you home with medicines for these symptoms.

Follow-up Assessment at Day 7 to 14:

  • This follow-up assessment is very important. You must follow up with your health care provider about 7 to 14 days after you have taken mifepristone tablets, 200mg, to be sure you are well, that you have had bleeding, and the pregnancy has passed from your uterus.
  • Your health care provider will assess whether your pregnancy has passed from your uterus. If your pregnancy continues, the chance that there may be birth defects is unknown. If you are still pregnant, your healthcare provider will talk with you about a surgical procedure to end your pregnancy.
  • If your pregnancy has ended, but not yet completely passed from your uterus, your provider will talk with you about other choices you have, including waiting, taking another dose of misoprostol, or having a surgical procedure to empty your uterus.

 

When should I begin birth control?

You can become pregnant again right after your pregnancy ends. If you do not want to become pregnant again, start using birth control as soon as your pregnancy ends or before you start having sexual intercourse again.

 

What should I avoid while taking mifepristone and misoprostol?

Do not take any other prescription or over-the-counter medicines (including herbal medicines or supplements) at any time during the treatment period without first asking your health care provider about them because they may interfere with the treatment. Ask your health care provider about what medicines you can take for pain and other side effects.

 

What are the possible side effects of mifepristone tablets, 200mg, and misoprostol?

Mifepristone may cause serious side effects.  See “What is the most important information I should know about mifepristone tablets, 200mg?” above. 

Cramping and bleeding. Cramping and vaginal bleeding are expected with this treatment. Usually, these symptoms mean that the treatment is working. But sometimes you can get cramping and bleeding and still be pregnant. This is why you must follow-up with your health care provider approximately 7 to 14 days after taking mifepristone tablets, 200mg. See “How should I take mifepristone tablets, 200mg?” for more information on your follow-up assessment. If you are not already bleeding after taking mifepristone, you probably will begin to bleed once you take misoprostol, the medicine you take 24 to 48 hours after mifepristone tablets, 200mg. Bleeding or spotting can be expected for an average of 9 to 16 days and may last for up to 30 days. Your bleeding may be similar to, or greater than, a normal heavy period. You may see blood clots and tissue. This is an expected part of passing the pregnancy.

The most common side effects of mifepristone treatment include: nausea, weakness, fever/chills, vomiting, headache, diarrhea and dizziness. Your provider will tell you how to manage any pain or other side effects. These are not all the possible side effects of mifepristone tablets, 200mg.

Call your health care provider for medical advice about any side effects that bother you or do not go away. You may report side effects to FDA at1-800-FDA-1088.

 

General information about the safe and effective use of mifepristone tablets, 200mg.

Medicines are sometimes prescribed for purposes other than those listed in a Medication Guide. This Medication Guide summarizes the most important information about Mifepristone tablets, 200mg. If you would like more information, talk with your health care provider. You may ask your health care provider for information about mifepristone tablets, 200mg, that is written for health care professionals.

 

For additional information about mifepristone, click for the Medication Guide and Full Prescribing Information.